Health & wellbeing

World Kidney Day: Fact Sheet

Werribee
12 Mar. 2020

It’s World Kidney Day!

It’s time to help raise awareness for the health of two of our most vital organs,

and to keep them functioning optimally!

Kidneys help make up something called the renal system, and their health is highly important as our kidneys help –

  • Remove wastes and extra fluids from our body
  • Make hormones that help control blood pressure, and blood volume
  • Make hormones that help make red blood cells
  • Help control blood pH, and electrolytes

When kidneys become diseased, it can look like many things. There can be kidney stones, cysts, inflammation, urinary tract infections (UTIs) as well as diabetic kidney disease.

Kidney diseases can also be chronic, meaning that it is ongoing, or acute, meaning that the illness is short-lived. Getting treatment early is highly important, and you are at a higher risk for kidney disease if you have high blood pressure or diabetes. Kidney Health Australia state that it is not “uncommon for people to lose up to 90% of their kidney function before getting any symptoms”.

 

So... how can I help my kidneys out?

You can:

  • Eat a healthy, and balanced diet that contains a lot of vegetables and fruits to get all the vitamins your body needs
  • Drink 8 glasses of water every day
  • Try to stay away from drugs, tobacco and alcohol

What are some signs my kidneys may not be working properly?

Kidney Health Australia have expressed that symptoms like:

  • Bad breath and metallic taste in your mouth,
  • Nausea and vomiting,
  • Blood in your urine, as well as changes in appearance (frothy, foaming etc.),
  • Pain in your kidney area, and
  • High blood pressure

should be monitored, as it if it caused by Kidney disease then symptoms will continue to worsen. However, these symptoms are broad and could be caused by other illnesses.
For more information you can visit healthdirect.gov.au/kidney-disease or Kidney Health Australia. If you are worried about your Kidney health contact your local general practitioner (GP), and ask for a Kidney Health Check.

 

Written by Clare, YAG Member